Railroad Certificates

Railroad Certificates

Colorado’s very existence may arguably be a result of the railroads. While Denver fought for years to obtain a rail line to serve its businesses and citizens, the railroad companies found the Colorado Rockies far too difficult an obstacle initially and opted to build their lines north and south of Colorado through more gentle terrain. This all changed once Colorado’s rich gold and silver districts grew and developed The rail companies had no choice but to build into and through the Colorado Rockies. The railroad legacy can be seen today throughout Colorado in abandoned railroad beds, tunnels through the Continental Divide and routes over numerous passes, which are still in use today where our highways follow much of the old rail routes. Much of Eastern Colorado is made up of small towns that cropped up along the rail lines. The railroad is still important today and is used extensively to carry Colorado’s rich and desirable, clean-burning coal for power in cities of Colorado, Wyoming and beyond. Street railways were built in many burgeoning cities to provide mass transit to its residents.

  • Colorado Springs & Manitou
    Street Railway Company – 1890
  • Colorado Springs Rapid Transit
    Railway Company – 1891
    Signed by E. A. Colburn
  • Colorado Springs and Suburban
    Railway Company – 1901
    Issued to W. S. Stratton
  • Denver Tramway Company – 1892
  • Colorado Midland Railway Company – 1897
  • Colorado Springs and Cripple Creek
    District Railway Company – 1902
    Signed by Irving Howbert
  • Midland Terminal Railway Company – 1899
    Signed by W. K. Gillett
  • Cripple Creek and Colorado Springs
    Railroad Company – 1915
    Signed by Spencer Penrose
  • Cripple Creek Central Railway Company – 1917
    Signed by A. E. Carlton
  • Colorado Railway Company – 1905